Guyana

Guyana

Case Study by: Sarah Pawlow Guyana is located on the northeastern coast of South America, located between Venezuela and Suriname. It has significant potential to fulfill a Nature Needs Half vision because approximately 75% of its territory is covered with natural vegetation, and approximately 8% of the country is currently in permanent protected areas. Guyana is part of the Guiana Shield which constitutes one of the oldest global land surfaces. It has the world’s second highest percentage of rainforest cover because of the extensive rainforest in the Amazon Basin in its southern region. The state manages 84% of forests, and indigenous Amerindians manage 14%. Four areas have been legally designated as protected areas: Kaieteur National Park, Shell Beach, the Kanuku Mountains, and the Iwokrama Centre for Rainforest Conservation. Other areas proposed for protection include Konashen, a community-owned Conservation Area, Mount Roraima and Orinduik Falls. Guyana is one of only a few countries to have forests that sequester more carbon than the nation’s human activities generate. With funding from Norway, Guyana was also the first country in the world to pursue a Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS) to adhere to the United Nations Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation (REDD+). The aim of the strategy is to reduce deforestation, create employment and increase the enforcement of environmental regulations. Indigenous Amerindians can opt-in to the REDD+ programme and receive payments through a consultative process. Guyana has made considerable progress in involving local communities, some of it achieved through developing an integrated Community Monitoring Reporting and Verification model.  For example, communities from 16 Makushi indigenous villages in Guyana were given smart phones to...
Amapá State, Brazil

Amapá State, Brazil

Case Study by: Austin Dever Scientific assessments over the last 20 years have determined that any ecoregion will thrive only if approximately fifty percent of its ‘wilderness’ remains intact. This means intact, high-functioning natural systems, and this is the philosophy of Nature Needs Half. Few places on earth better embody that philosophy than Amapá State, Brazil. Located in northern Brazil on the borders of French Guiana and Surinam, Amapá State is defined by superlatives. It is home to the world’s largest tropical forest national park, Tumucumaque National Park, and its conservation protection zones shelter plants and animals found nowhere else on earth. The WILD Foundation promotes the goal of protecting at least fifty percent for nature and, incredibly, Amapá, (in collaboration) with the Brazilian federal government and international and local conservation organizations, has designated nearly three-quarters of its total landmass of 143,000 square kilometers as protected conservation zones. As rainforests across Brazil continue to fall prey to deforestation driven by infrastructure development, mining, logging and agriculture, an amazing 92 percent of Amapá State’s rainforests remain intact. Amapá’s dedication to conservation dates back to the early 1990s, when visionary governor João Capiberibe instituted a sustainable development plan for the state. Following the path he charted, the Amapá state government in 2002 announced the creation of Tumucumaque National Park, a nearly 40,000 square kilometer tropical forest larger than the U.S. state of Indiana. The new park abutted the Guiana Amazonian Park in neighboring French Guiana, creating a cross-border preserve of 59,000 square kilometers. The next year, Amapá announced the creation of the Amapá Biodiversity Corridor, covering 70 percent of the state,...