Boulder’s Conservation Legacy

Boulder’s Conservation Legacy

Ruth Wright, a leader in Boulder’s Open Space movement, tells the story of Boulder’s conservation legacy from the Olmsted Plan to current day. Ruth speaks of the visionaries who hiked our backdrop to establish the Blue Line for the city and the many successes for wild-nature since. She also talks about the ongoing challenges of managing protected lands so we keep nature alive and well. Boulder, Colorado is a leading example of the Nature Needs Half vision with 68% of the county’s land protected. Nature Needs Half is a global call to action to protect at least half of the planet’s land and water to support all life on earth.  See the full Boulder case-study> Produced by Morgan Heim & the “Legacy team”. *The person mentioned in the video is Fredrick Law Olmsted, Sr – the designer of New York’s Central Park.  But, it was actually Fredrick Law Olmsted Jr. is the son of Fredrick Law Olmsted, who came to...

Citizens unite

In Macedonia people are taking off work to replant trees that have been lost in their many fires. Between 2006 and 2007 it is estimated that 35,000 hectares have been lost to fires. For three years a movement to get everyday citizens involved in the replanting process has been gaining steam with an annual day to volunteer supported by government and NGO’s alike. Their efforts have planted more than 30 million trees, only a small dent in a restoration project that is expected to take 50 years but it does serve to bring environmental awareness to the people of Macedonia and offer a hands-on way to get involved. Read more...

Reserves: How Much Is Enough and How Do We Get There From Here?

(Essay) Reserves: How Much Is Enough and How Do We Get There From Here? By John Terborgh, Duke University Is the human species doing enough to conserve the rest of the world’s species for posterity? If not, then how much is enough? This is a key question, and opinions about the correct answer vary widely. An industry spokesperson is likely to ask, “Don’t they (the conservationists) have enough already?” “How much do they want, anyway?” This is a typical but inappropriate response, first, because the issue is really a scientific one, and second, because it puts conservationists in the awkward position of having to say that reserving a certain amount of habitat will be sufficient to save nature. The only correct answer from a scientific standpoint is, “all of it.” That is how much of Earth was available to nature before modern man entered the picture. Since then, at least half of Earth’s terrestrial environment has been degraded or completely transformed to support the human enterprise. We know that half or more of Earth’s native habitat cannot be eliminated without endangering large numbers of species. In fact, more than 100 species have gone extinct in the U.S. alone since the Endangered Species Act (ESA) was approved by Congress. An additional 1200+ species are currently listed as endangered, and an even larger number of unlisted candidate species lurks in the background. This should be warning enough that humans are pushing our luck in preempting Earth’s resources for ourselves. Thus, the best answer to the question, “How much do they want?” is “Everything that is left.” Admittedly, this is a tall...

Conservation, bringing countries together

Austria, Hungary, Croatia, Slovenia and Serbia have come together to protect about 800,000 ha of floodplains along their shared boundaries. The Mura, Drava and Danube rivers, rich in biodiversity and cultural heritage, are known as ‘Europe’s Amazon,’ and are now being protected from potentially harmful sand dredging and dam development. This landmark cooperative decision represents the best of Nature Needs Half’s goals, as it has paved the way for the first five-country protected area. Read more...

Cycling Silk Team Featured by Turkish NGO

The Cycling Silk team is learning about conservation and transboundary initiatives all along the Silk Road.  Check out their recent conversation with the KuzeyDoga Society. Canadian Cyclists Explore Conservation across… by kuzeydoga The vision of KuzeyDoga Society is to prevent extinctions and consequent collapses of critical ecosystem processes while making sure that human communities benefit from conservation as much as the wildlife they help conserve. Learn more about Cycling Silk about what it means for Nature Needs Half...

Is religion, the key to conservation?

Islamic leaders in Indonesia sure think so. Many Islamic conservationists have banded together to form FORDALING (the Islamic Leader Forum for Environmental Care), and are working to spread environmental education through religious studies. The group has put together teaching seminars, planted seedlings in its nursery, and most recently helped publish the Ayat-Auat Konservasi, the Islamic Verses for Conservation. This 120 page book utilizes verses from the Koran to address why conservation should be important to Indonesian Muslims, stressing Muhammad’s compassion for individual animals as well as for the greater ecosystem.  Read more about how these Islamic leaders are teaching conservation...
Page 5 of 8« First...34567...Last »