Conservation Targets: Do They Help?

Conservation Targets: Do They Help? By Michael E. Soulé & M. A. Sanjayan; Science, New Series, Vol. 279, No. 5359. (Mar. 27, 1998), pp. 2060-2061. The most irreversible environmental problem of this era is the projected rapid loss of biodiversity, including the disappearance of up to half the world’s species. In response, many international commissions and nature conservation organizations have called for the near-term protection of at least 10 or 12% of the total land area in each nation or in each ecosystem. If successful, this campaign would double or triple the land area now designated as national parks or similar strict reserves. We are concerned, however, that these target percentages could become de facto ceilings of protection and imply that protecting 10% or so of the land is sufficient to prevent the predicted major extinction event. >>Read the full...

How Much is Enough?

Center for Large Landscape Conservation; Literature Review on Select Topics in Landscape Conservation; May 27, 2010 How much is enough? What is the minimum area required to ensure the maintenance of biodiversity in an area? A 10 percent (or 12%) conservation target of land area in each nation (Myers 1979, Miller 1984, Soule and Sanjayan 1998) is frequently cited and has been recurrently used in setting policy, though with little biological support. Soule and Sanjayan (1998) interviewed a set of biologists and land managers about this target and most agreed that it was developed for political expediency and was too small to protect biodiversity. Based on published parameters for the species-area relationship, there would be a 50% decline in species with a 90% loss of area. A sample of conservation estimates from published studies with varying biodiversity objectives found that approximately 50% (range: 33 – 75%) of the land area needs to be protected (Soule and Sanjayan 1998). >>Read the full...

Sanctuary Asia article

Nature Needs Half by Vance G. Martin. Published December 2010 in Sanctuary Asia. Because satisfying one’s true needs is essential to assuring survival, stability, and prosperity, Nature Needs Half is a direct response to a rapidly unfolding situation in which human survival, stability and prosperity is the least assured than it has ever been since our ancestors left the trees. >>Read the full...

El Mensaje de Mérida

Extract from the San Antonio Current on December 9, 2009. Article by Greg Harman. Climate Change isn’t all about stuffing our collective tailpipe. Restoring oceans of wilderness is just as vital to saving the planet. >>Read the...

Nature Needs Half and WILD10

Nature Needs Half and WILD10 (editorial, International Journal of Wilderness, December, 2011, www.ijw.org ) Vance G. Martin (President, The WILD Foundation) How much space does nature really need? This question has increasingly been the focus of conservation biologists and many others as the natural sciences have scaled up to consider nature from a landscape and seascape perspective, and in the process gaining a much better understanding of ecological services. Professor E. O. Wilson adroitly alluded to this in his seminal work The Future of Life (2002) when he said, “Half the world for humanity, half for the rest of life, to create a planet both self-sustaining and pleasant.” >>Read the full...
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