CPAWS Conservation Plan: 50% At Least

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, 2007 CPAWS Conservation plan calls for at least 50% of Canada’s public lands and waters to be protected. This number is based on the best available science about what is necessary to keep vibrant evolving ecosystems and all the species that inhabit them alive through time. It also represents the belief that our one species can share the earth with all the others. >>Read the entire Conservation...
Saving Nature’s Legacy: Protecting and Restoring

Saving Nature’s Legacy: Protecting and Restoring

Reed F. Noss and Allen Y. Cooperrider in Saving Nature’s Legacy: Protecting and Restoring Biodiversity (Island Press, Washington, D.C., 1994) Noss & Cooperrider reviewed many conservation planning initiatives and determined that between 25% and 75% protection was necessary to maintain ecological integrity. Written by two leading conservation biologists, Saving Nature’s Legacy is a thorough and readable introduction to issues of land management and conservation biology. It presents a broad, land-based approach to biodiversity conservation in the United States, with the authors succinctly translating principles, techniques, and findings of the ecological sciences into an accessible and practical plan for action. After laying the groundwork for biodiversity conservation – what biodiversity is, why it is important, its status in North America – Noss and Cooperrider consider the strengths and limitations of past and current approaches to land management. They then present the framework for a bold new strategy, with explicit guidelines on: Inventorying biodiversity Selecting areas for protection Designing regional and continental reserve networks Establishing monitoring programs Setting priorities for getting the job done Throughout the volume, the authors provide in-depth assessments of what must be done to protect and restore the full spectrum of native biodiversity to the North American continent. Buy this...

Half of B.C. must be protected as hedge against climate change

Half of B.C. must be protected as hedge against climate change, by Larry Pynn, Vancouver Sun January 27, 2010 The B.C. government is being asked to develop a joint strategy for nature conservation and climate change leading to biodiversity protection for half the province’s land base. A coalition of leading environmental groups says that existing parks and protected areas cover almost 15 per cent of the land base — not nearly enough to protect landscapes and wildlife against the ravages of climate change. The report, prepared by forest ecologist Jim Pojar, recommends that “at least an additional 35 per cent of the land base (be) managed for biodiversity and carbon,” a recognition that natural forests store carbon dioxide better than do industrial forests. New land designations and/or tenures will likely be required to guide management of the expanded conservation network outside of existing parks and protected areas, the report states. Only activities “compatible with the long-term objectives of biodiversity conservation and adaptation” should be allowed in these new areas, it said. Connectivity of landscapes will become increasingly important as B.C.’s climate continues to warm and species migrate to find new homes. >>Continue reading >>Read the new climate...

Sanctuary Asia article

Nature Needs Half by Vance G. Martin. Published December 2010 in Sanctuary Asia. Because satisfying one’s true needs is essential to assuring survival, stability, and prosperity, Nature Needs Half is a direct response to a rapidly unfolding situation in which human survival, stability and prosperity is the least assured than it has ever been since our ancestors left the trees. >>Read the full...
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