Sanctuary Asia article

Nature Needs Half by Vance G. Martin. Published December 2010 in Sanctuary Asia. Because satisfying one’s true needs is essential to assuring survival, stability, and prosperity, Nature Needs Half is a direct response to a rapidly unfolding situation in which human survival, stability and prosperity is the least assured than it has ever been since our ancestors left the trees. >>Read the full...

El Mensaje de Mérida

Extract from the San Antonio Current on December 9, 2009. Article by Greg Harman. Climate Change isn’t all about stuffing our collective tailpipe. Restoring oceans of wilderness is just as vital to saving the planet. >>Read the...

Nature Needs Half and WILD10

Nature Needs Half and WILD10 (editorial, International Journal of Wilderness, December, 2011, www.ijw.org ) Vance G. Martin (President, The WILD Foundation) How much space does nature really need? This question has increasingly been the focus of conservation biologists and many others as the natural sciences have scaled up to consider nature from a landscape and seascape perspective, and in the process gaining a much better understanding of ecological services. Professor E. O. Wilson adroitly alluded to this in his seminal work The Future of Life (2002) when he said, “Half the world for humanity, half for the rest of life, to create a planet both self-sustaining and pleasant.” >>Read the full...

We Need to Scale Up Marine Protection: A Global Perspective

We Need to Scale Up Marine Protection: A Global Perspective (International Journal of Wilderness, December, 2011, www.ijw.org ) Cyril F. Kormos (Vice President for Policy, The WILD Foundation; World Commission for Protected Areas, Co-Chair, North America) News reports of the declining health of our planet’s oceans have become sadly routine: from dwindling blue fin tuna stocks to the deepwater oil spills, and from reports of retreating sea ice in the Arctic to large jellyfish outbreaks. A bleak picture of our marine environments has been emerging for some time…… >>Read the full...

A New Spatial Perspective for a Healthy Planet

A New Spatial Perspective for a Healthy Planet (International Journal of Wilderness, December, 2011, www.ijw.org ); Dr Magnus Sylven (environmental consultant; Co-Chair, WILD10, the 10th World Wilderness Congress; former Director, WWF Europe) Human impact on the world since the Industrial Revolution has been so comprehensive that it has ushered in a new geological epoch, which scientists have called the Anthropocene (Smith 2008). Impacts on the Earth’s physical, chemical, and biological environment, from rapidly increasing rates of extinctions of plants and animals to ocean acidification to global temperature increases, are so profound that they are now altering the geological record. We are bringing an end to the Holocene epoch, which began around 12,000 years ago……. >>Read the full...

Trail & Timberline Magazine

Balancing Act: learning to be a nature lover and a nature adventurer, by Morgan Heim and Emily Loose appeared in the Summer 2011 Trail and Timberline Magazine, a publication of the Colorado Mountain Club.  The article, which focuses specifically on Nature Needs Half in Colorado, discusses the many things we receive from wild-nature and the important role of stewardship.  Below is a brief excerpt, or you can view the full article. A typical Saturday morning: wake up, stretch, and leave the comfort of your cozy bed in favor of a brutally steep and rocky mountain summit. You find yourself magnificently alone somewhere between the trees and clouds. Just you and nature. Beautiful. Peaceful. Is this the weekend routine of the average Colorado citizen—like you or me? Or is it the daily routine of every bighorn sheep, mountain lion, bear, and every other critter that calls this mountain ecosystem home? It can be both, but there is a careful balance. Colorado is a state with immense natural resources. Of course, there are the world-famous national parks and wilderness areas, and the 54 mountain peaks stretching over 14,000 feet towards the sky. Then, there are the 42 state forests and hundreds of thousands of acres of municipal open space. All of this seeming bounty composes the natural landscape we call home. And, with nearly 30 million of the state’s more than 66 million acres protected, the “wild” experience is never far away. There is little doubt that Colorado is a leader in protecting wild nature, and we are fortunate to enjoy a plethora of wild opportunities. But, as many of us...
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