A New Spatial Perspective for a Healthy Planet

A New Spatial Perspective for a Healthy Planet (International Journal of Wilderness, December, 2011, www.ijw.org ); Dr Magnus Sylven (environmental consultant; Co-Chair, WILD10, the 10th World Wilderness Congress; former Director, WWF Europe) Human impact on the world since the Industrial Revolution has been so comprehensive that it has ushered in a new geological epoch, which scientists have called the Anthropocene (Smith 2008). Impacts on the Earth’s physical, chemical, and biological environment, from rapidly increasing rates of extinctions of plants and animals to ocean acidification to global temperature increases, are so profound that they are now altering the geological record. We are bringing an end to the Holocene epoch, which began around 12,000 years ago……. >>Read the full...

Trail & Timberline Magazine

Balancing Act: learning to be a nature lover and a nature adventurer, by Morgan Heim and Emily Loose appeared in the Summer 2011 Trail and Timberline Magazine, a publication of the Colorado Mountain Club.  The article, which focuses specifically on Nature Needs Half in Colorado, discusses the many things we receive from wild-nature and the important role of stewardship.  Below is a brief excerpt, or you can view the full article. A typical Saturday morning: wake up, stretch, and leave the comfort of your cozy bed in favor of a brutally steep and rocky mountain summit. You find yourself magnificently alone somewhere between the trees and clouds. Just you and nature. Beautiful. Peaceful. Is this the weekend routine of the average Colorado citizen—like you or me? Or is it the daily routine of every bighorn sheep, mountain lion, bear, and every other critter that calls this mountain ecosystem home? It can be both, but there is a careful balance. Colorado is a state with immense natural resources. Of course, there are the world-famous national parks and wilderness areas, and the 54 mountain peaks stretching over 14,000 feet towards the sky. Then, there are the 42 state forests and hundreds of thousands of acres of municipal open space. All of this seeming bounty composes the natural landscape we call home. And, with nearly 30 million of the state’s more than 66 million acres protected, the “wild” experience is never far away. There is little doubt that Colorado is a leader in protecting wild nature, and we are fortunate to enjoy a plethora of wild opportunities. But, as many of us...

Nature Needs Half in the Economist

Boreal blues – In the frigid north tension grows between conservation and development CANADA’S vast boreal zone contains the world’s largest intact old-growth forest and has more fresh water than the Amazon. Its flora help to slow climate change and it is a breeding ground for 3 billion migratory songbirds. Only 12% of the region is now formally protected, well below the 50% scientists say is necessary to save its ecosystem. On May 9th Quebec unveiled the Plan Nord, a C$2.1 billion ($2.2 billion) proposal that seeks both to develop its northern region and to safeguard its environment. But whether those two objectives are actually compatible remains open for debate. Continue reading...

Nature in Boulder: A look into the future

Once land is protected…then what? WILD is working with our local partners in Boulder, Colorado on exactly that question.  As you can read in the Boulder case-study, over half of the land in Boulder County is protected. But, what is needed to ensure that nature continues to thrive in these areas for generations to come? One of Boulder’s biggest conundrums is loving the land to death.  With over five million visitor days per year, the City of Boulder Open Space handles more human traffic than nearby Rocky Mountain National Park.  Emily Loose, WILD’s Director of Communication, recently wrote a Guest Opinion for our local paper encouraging Boulder residents to think about the future, honor the leaders who established Open Space and think fully about future generations and nature when considering the management of our Open Space.  Read the full OpEd...
Ms. Maggies Earth Adventures

Ms. Maggies Earth Adventures

Ms. Maggie’s Earth Adventures creates online, environmentally focused learning materials for school-aged learners.   The stories and activities that comprise each unit in Maggie’s Earth Adventures are presented to introduce students to actual environmental issues and to motivate students to delve deeper into the issues presented. In the Fall of 2010, Ms. Maggie’s featured two lessons focused on Nature Needs Half — language arts/science activities and math activities tailored to different levels of learners.  The materials are distributed to a network of over 20,000 teachers in both English and Spanish (approx 1,000 of those teachers primarily use the Spanish materials). In the language arts/science activity students read an article about the importance of green space in metropolitan areas, highlighting Nature Needs Half. Follow-up activities include questions designed to scaffold learning to further develop content area comprehension skills. The activity is available on the primary and intermediate levels. A companion emergent level activity is also available. The WAP correlates with Content Standard F, Science in Personal and Social Perspectives of the National Science Standards. In the match activity, students are asked to think like a city planner, and put their math skills to the test of figuring out how to improve our “Green Lungs” and harmonize the space for people, forests, wildlife, and water based on Nature Needs Half.  This activity is available on the primary and intermediate levels. Here is a brief excerpt from the language arts lesson: “Everyone needs clean water and food from the land. Too often we forget that nature is really the source of all life. What we get from the store or tap is only...
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