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Nature Needs Half is a global movement that consists of network of international partners working to protect nature at the scale she needs around the world. The WILD Foundation is proud to steward this movement in partnership with a larger steering committee, and serves as its coordinating hub. Please contact the WILD Foundation for more information.

Woman journaling on a mountaintop. Photo by Tyler Nix.
The WILD Foundation

717 Poplar Street
Boulder, CO 80304
303.442.8811

Preening egret. Photo by David Clode.
Kundalunga National Park

Home to one of Africa’s largest waterfalls, Kundelungu is also home to a great diversity of wildlife, including egrets, pelicans, leopards, and hippos.

Virunga National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo. Cal Tjeenk Willink.
Virunga National Park

Africa’s oldest national park and its most biologically diverse protected area, Virunga is home to a quarter of the world’s critically endangered gorillas.

Photo by natataek/ Apeldoorn Apenheul Zoo
  Member

Bonobo Conservation Initiative

We work to protect bonobos, preserve their tropical rainforest habitat, and empower local communities in the Congo Basin.

Gorilla in forest. Photo by Mike Arney.
Region
DRC

11

Ecoregions

03

Partners

14

% Protected

Nearly half of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is covered in rich, primary forest, making the rainforest here the largest in all of Africa. But immense human suffering caused...

Congo's rain forests under logging threat

Oil palm, rubber could trigger ‘storm’ of deforestation in the Congo Basin

Tropical rainforest. Photo by Nathan Ziemanski.
The World’s Second Largest Rainforest: Congo

Peat swamp forest. Photo by Sergio Baffoni.
Historic agreement signed to protect the world’s largest tropical peatland

Mother & child in Africa's rainforest. Photo by Max Chiswick.
Clashing over conservation: saving Congo’s forest and its Pygmies

Lone hyena. Photo by Janko Ferlic.
Garamba National Park

The last refuge for the world’s final population of Northern white rhinos, this protected area alone was not enough to save this iconic species.