As Roads Spread in Rainforests, The Environmental Toll Grows

Article by: William Laurance From Brazil to Borneo, new roads are being built into tropical forests at a dizzying pace, putting previously intact wilderness at risk. If we hope to preserve rainforests, a leading researcher says, new strategies must be adopted to limit the number of roads and reduce their impacts. >>Read the full article from Yale Environment...
Living Planet: Connected Planet

Living Planet: Connected Planet

PREVENTING THE END OF THE WORLD’S WILDLIFE MIGRATIONS THROUGH ECOLOGICAL NETWORKS This rapid-response assessment was recently produced by GRID-Arendal, an official United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) collaborating centre, supporting informed decision making and awareness-raising through: * Environmental information management and  assessment * Capacity building services * Outreach and communication tools,  methodologies and products PREFACE Through the air, over land and in water, over ten thousand species numbering millions of animals travel around the world in a network of migratory pathways. The very foundation of these migratory species is their connection to places and corridors across the planet. The loss of a single point in their migration can jeopardize the entire population, while their concentrations make them highly vulnerable to over harvesting and poaching. In the northern regions of the world, the V-shaped formation of loudly honking geese in spring and in autumn symbolize that a new season is coming. In the 1900s people in northern Norway marvelled at the abundance of lesser white-fronted geese, which then numbered in the thousands. Today the Norwegian stock of these geese is so small that researchers are on first-name terms with each and every bird. Iconic animals such as wildebeest and antelopes have declined by 35–90 per cent in a matter of decades, due to fences, roads and other infrastructure blocking their migration routes, and from overharvesting. Indeed, the current rise in poaching calls for renewed international efforts for controlling illegal hunting and creating alternative livelihoods, against the backdrop of increasing trade in endangered animals for their fur, meat, horns or tusks. We are only just beginning to grasp the consequences that climate change is having...
Marine Conservation References

Marine Conservation References

A short list of marine conservation reference texts. Barr, B. 2007. Ocean Wilderness: Interesting Idea or Ecological Imperative? International Journal of Wilderness Special Issue: The Wild Planet Project. Dudley, N. (Editor). 2008. Guidelines for Applying Protected Area Management Categories. IUCN. Gland, Switzerland, IUCN. x + 86pp. Halpern, B.S., Walbridge, S., Selkoe, K.A. Kappel, C.V., Micheli, F, D’Agrosa, C., Bruno, J.F., Casey, K.S., Ebert, C., Fox, H.E., Fujita, R., Heinemann, D., Lenihan, H.S., Madin, E.M.P., Perry, M.T., Selig, E.R., Spalding, M., Steneck, R., Watson, R., 2008. A Global Map of Human Impact on Marine Ecosystems. Science 319: 948-952 Hoegh-Guldberg, O. and Bruno, J.F. 2010. The Impact of Climate Change on the World’s Marine Ecosystems. Science 328: 1523-1528. International Union for the Conservation of Nature – Species Survival Commission. 2008. Status of the World’s Marine Species. Kimball, L.A. 2005.The International Legal Regime of the High Seas and the Seabed Beyond the Limits of National Jurisdiction and Options for Cooperation for the Establishment of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in Marine Areas Beyond the Limits of National Jurisdiction. Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity, Montreal, Technical Series no. 19, 64 pages. Kormos, C.F. (Editor) 2008. A Handbook on International Wilderness Law and Policy. Fulcrum Publishing, Golden, Colorado. Laffoley, D. d’A., (ed.) 2008. Towards Networks of Marine Protected Areas. The MPA Plan of Action for IUCN’s World Commission on Protected Areas. IUCN WCPA, Gland, Switzerland. 28 pp. Lubchenko, J. and Petes, L.E., The Interconnected Biosphere: Science at the Ocean’s Tipping Points; in Sherman, K. and Adams, S. (Eds.). 2010. Sustainable Development of the World’s Large Marine Ecosystems during Climate Change: A commemorative volume...

The A-Z of Areas of Biodiversity Importance

The terminology of conservation can be confusing.  Endless acronyms and very specific terms that only the ‘specialists’ can decode.  For Nature Needs Half, we use the protected area categories as defined by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).  The IUCN categories define protected areas according to the management objectives, but don’t always mesh with in-country or local definitions and terminology. There are many other terms to define important biodiversity areas, including RAMSAR Sites, Marine Protected Areas and Transboundary Protected Areas.  To help demystify the terminology of protected areas and biodiversity areas, UNEP-WCMC and partners launched A-Z Areas of Biodiversity, a glossary of various important systems to assign and protect areas for biodiversity conservation. Check it...

Why “interconnected” is important

Sarah Kuck recently wrote a great article for YES! Magazine about why wildlife needs room to roam and why connecting protected areas is important.  She highlights issues such as global climate shifts, loss of natural predators and the need for conservation to include economic opportunities for local communities.  Her dialog very clearly and concisely summarizes the need for large, protected areas that are interconnected – in essence, why Nature Needs Half.  Here is a brief excerpt, and I encourage you to read the full article “Wildlife Right of Way” > (But) biologists like Michael Soulé and Reed Noss say grizzlies, wolves, and other big mammals shouldn’t be a casualty of modern society. They could make a comeback—if we give them what they need most: space. Soulé and Noss presented a new method for conservation in their 1998 paper, “Rewilding and Biodiversity: Complementary Goals for Continental Conservation.” They discussed how the expansion of national parks and protected lands is necessary but only part of the answer. To piece back together the vast ecosystems that once stretched across North America, rewilding suggests an additional focus on reconnecting the scattered pockets of remaining wilderness, and on re-establishing predator populations. These methods have now evolved from conservation idea to practice and have become promising tools for fighting biodiversity loss. Conservation is often about saving one dwindling population, one small remnant. Rewilding asks us to think big—to envision a continent-wide conservation strategy, with large core areas of protected land linked by lush, safe passageways for migrating species. Rewilding says that, although saving big spaces is critical, linking the spaces is just as crucial to...

Nature News: Marine protection goes large

As the creation of giant reserves gains momentum, some fear such areas don’t always conserve the habitats most in need. The past five years has seen a spurt in the creation of giant marine protection areas, including a 320,000 sq km marine reserve announced earlier this month in Australia. “Now we have a competition for politicians to see who can have the biggest one,” said Daniel Pauly of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, at the start of the Society for Conservation Biology’s 2nd International Marine Conservation Congress in Victoria, Canada, on Saturday.  Read the full article by Nicola Jones...
Page 3 of 512345