The Field Guide to Nature Needs Half: The Amazon is calling, will you pick up?

The Field Guide to Nature Needs Half: The Amazon is calling, will you pick up?

Photo © Rodrigo Salles, Untamed Angling Click here to find the previous installment of the Nature Needs Half Field Guide to the Kayapo Project. This is the fourth installment of a five-part series featuring a partner project in the Nature Needs Half Network. Each installment will run weekly, and every month we will spotlight a different member of the Network to reveal how their work is connecting nature across the planet for the benefit of all life on Earth and to ensure that we achieve our goal of 50% protected by 2050. For more information about this project, please contact jackieb@natureneedshalf.org Summary: Who does the Amazon belong to? As of this moment, the Kayapo steward much of the land there, but illegal industries are threatening to destroy this irreplaceable habitat that houses a third of Earth’s plants and animals. And that has consequences for all of us. If they Kayapo are to succeed, they need our help. Discover how you can become a part of the international team strengthening Kayapo territory and preserving the life-giving rainforest for all life on Earth. “Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit.” – Edward Abbey You wish to fill your belly so you head outside the protective ring of the village, down to where the land ends until you can go no further. Standing on the shore of the great river, its waters lapping against your bare toes, you face the current. You notice the fallen fragments of the forest, swift and glittering, sailing downstream before they vanish from your view altogether. Then you draw your weapon. Maybe it’s a...
The Field Guide to Nature Needs Half: The secret to saving the rainforest? Hint: It’s smaller than you think.

The Field Guide to Nature Needs Half: The secret to saving the rainforest? Hint: It’s smaller than you think.

Photo © Cristina Mittermeier Click here to find the previous installment of the Nature Needs Half Field Guide to the Kayapo Project. This is the third installment of a five-part series featuring a partner project in the Nature Needs Half Network. Each installment will run weekly, and every month we will spotlight a different member of the Network to reveal how their work is connecting nature across the planet for the benefit of all life on Earth and to ensure that we achieve our goal of 50% protected by 2050. For more information about this project, please contact jackieb@natureneedshalf.org Summary: Where do you find your power and independence? The Kayapo find theirs beneath the rainforest canopy. In this installment of the Nature Needs Half Field Guide to the Kayapo Project, discover how the gifts of nature can revive the autonomy of an entire culture.    In Kayapo lands, everyone knows the shape of the universe. It’s a wasp’s nest. No one has actually seen it of course. Nothing like that has happened since the time of the ancestors. In those days, before men descended to Earth on a rope cast through an opening in the bottom of the heavens, they gazed across the cosmos and noticed that it was a circle comprised of many delicate layers. Since then their children and their children’s children have guarded the memory of the ancestors’ knowledge in the shapes they fashion from day-to-day. See the sun-like corona of the men’s feathered headdresses? Notice the fields, round as a woman’s pregnant belly? And what about the villages themselves, with buildings carefully arranged in rings...
The Field Guide to Nature Needs Half: Kayapo Prowess – Could you defend a rainforest from deforestation without an iPhone?

The Field Guide to Nature Needs Half: Kayapo Prowess – Could you defend a rainforest from deforestation without an iPhone?

Photo © Martin Schoeller Find the first installment of the Nature Needs Half Field Guide to the Kayapo Project here. This is the second installment of a five-part series featuring a partner project in the Nature Needs Half Network. Each installment will run weekly, and every month we will spotlight a different member of the Network to reveal how their work is connecting nature across the planet for the benefit of all life on Earth and to ensure that we achieve our goal of 50% protected by 2050.   For more information about this project, please contact jackieb@natureneedshalf.org Summary:  A picture may be worth a thousand words but what if the picture is misleading and the words are inaccurate? In this installment of the Nature Needs Half Field Guide to the Kayapo Project, we get at the stunning truth that energizes the resilience and unwavering will of Chief Raoni and the Kayapo people to protect their land at all costs. Without the assistance of modern technology, Chief Raoni is relying on the help of NGOs. But attracting the attention of world leaders and experienced conservationists is difficult in the middle of a rainforest. How the Kayapo developed and sustain outside alliances is a critical component of their success and the subject of this blog.   When we left off last week, we had just begun to discuss the Kayapo’s incredible ability to leverage traditional skills and knowledge to defend their home and the rainforest from an amoral and technologically advanced foe. Given that information, few things could be more certain than the courage, resolve, and strategic sophistication of the Kayapo people...
The Field Guide to Nature Needs Half: Traditional Cultures & NGOs Ally To Prevent The Wholesale Deforestation Of The Rainforest

The Field Guide to Nature Needs Half: Traditional Cultures & NGOs Ally To Prevent The Wholesale Deforestation Of The Rainforest

Photo © Cristina Mittermeier This is the first installment of a five-part series featuring a partner project in the Nature Needs Half Network. Each installment will run weekly, and every month we will spotlight a different member of the Network to reveal how their work is connecting nature across the planet for the benefit of all life on Earth and to ensure that we achieve our goal of 50% protected by 2050. For more information about this project, please contact jackieb@natureneedshalf.org Summary: The 8,000 strong Kayapo tribe are fighting valiantly to defend 11 million acres of rainforest from the total destruction caused by illegal mining and logging operations. Against the odds, they are succeeding, but only with the international support provided by outside NGOs. The Nature Needs Half Network prioritizes bringing greater attention to the efforts of Indigenous people to preserve and defend their home ecology and programs that defend large landscapes, protecting nature at the scale she needs to continue to function on our behalf.   In 1954, somewhere beneath the Amazon’s vast rainforest canopy, a meeting occurred between three men that would change the course of history for an entire culture and the living lands that this culture had defended for centuries. Two of the men were brothers, Cláudio and Leonardo Villas-Bôas. Both were citizens of Brazil entrusted by their government with a vital economic mission: the penetration of the tropical forests to prune from the densely living undergrowth areas wide enough for the construction of roads and airfields. The brothers, though unambiguous emissaries of the industrialized world, were nevertheless singular in their compassion for the Indigenous...

Half the world must be set aside for nature, says Canadian conservationist

Originally published August 27, 2017 by CBC Radio Canada Listen to the full radio segment > Harvey Locke is a self-described “free range conservationist”. His ancestors lived in the mountains of the Bow Valley before Banff became a national park, and he still lives in the town of Banff. He happily shares his property with wildlife. It’s not rare for a grizzly bear, or a wolf, or a 700-pound elk to wander through his backyard. Locke helped lead the charge in the 1990s to link together parks and protected areas along what he calls the spinal column of North America — the Rocky Mountains. He first discovered his passion for conserving the Canadian wilderness when he was attending college and living in a mountain town in the Swiss Alps. “I was astonished over time that we didn’t see anything else that was alive there — how regulated the forests were, how the rivers were polluted, [how] the streams had all been dammed,” he tells The Sunday Edition‘s guest host David Gray. “As lovely as it was visually, it was biologically terribly impoverished. To my great personal surprise, I kind of made a vow to myself: I am not going to let that happen to the Canadian Rockies,” he recalls. The result is still a work in progress, but the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative, which he helped spearhead, has led to wildlife overpasses on highways and connects habitats from the U.S. to Canada. “It was just the new scale at which we needed to practise conservation,” he explains. Continue reading the full article...

Safeguarding space for nature, securing our future

From our colleagues at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) WHEN: 27 Feb – 28 Feb 2018 WHERE: Huxley Lecture Theatre, Main Meeting Rooms, Zoological Society of London, Outer Circle, Regents Park, NW1 4RY  REGISTER: www.zsl.org/ticket/safeguarding-space-for-nature-securing-our-future-both-days We are rapidly losing Earth’s wild species and wild spaces, with global vertebrate populations set to decline by two-thirds by 2020. Under the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020, Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) have pledged to protect, by this date, at least 17% land and freshwater and 10% ocean, particularly areas of importance for biodiversity and ecosystem services, in systems of effective, equitable and ecologically connected protected and conserved areas. But is this target adequate, and, if not, what space needs to be conserved and how in order to sustain humans and the rest of life on earth? Over the next few years, governments will be reviewing the current Strategic Plan and considering a new strategy to meet the vision of conserving biodiversity and maintaining ecosystem services and a healthy planet for all by 2050, as part of the wider 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. As part of this process, this symposium will bring together international scientists, conservation practitioners, policy-makers, business leaders, civil society and donors to (1) review the science informing future area-based conservation targets, (2) evaluate the implications of various policy options, (3) provide balanced, evidence-based recommendations to Parties to the CBD and other policy processes and (4) raise awareness of the need for a more ambitious, holistic and effective strategy on space for nature, incorporating protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.  The symposium will complement and integrate the work of other...
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