Australia Continental Corridors Plan

Australia Continental Corridors Plan

By: Vance G. Martin The first continental scale plan for ecological corridors has been produced in Australia, and is now out for comment. Members of The World Commission on Protected Areas of the IUCN were the driving force. Our colleagues at the Mountain Biome Working Group of WCPA have made further information available. Here is a brief overview from Penny Figgis, Regional CoChair of WCPA: The WCPA network played a major role over the last 6 years in championing the connectivity concept through submissions, letters, personal representations and being centrally involved in key meetings, such as the two Linking Landscapes Forums, and the drafting of major documents such as the Kingscliffe Communique. Individually, many members have been the pioneers, scientists, policy experts and overall champions of the concept of integrated landscape approaches as a whole and of particular initiatives. (Many people over) many years of outstanding work brought us to this point of major national policy endorsement. The draft report to the Australian Government Minister for the Environment, The Hon Tony Burke MP, was prepared by the National Wildlife Corridors Advisory Group, a Group which was chaired by the Hon Bob Debus AM and supported by other WCPA members including Vice Chair for Mountains and Connectivity Graeme Worboys and Prof. Brendan Mackey. This is the first whole-of-continent approach to connectivity conservation for the world and recognises a range of different corridors at different scales , including, importantly, a few select and strategic (yet to be designated) National Wildlife Corridors. The draft report also advises that new Legislation is proposed to be introduced later this year to formalise the implementation...

Bolder Thinking for Conservation

Bolder Thinking for Conservation, Conservation Biology, Volume 26, No. 1, 2012. Noss et al Reed Noss and others  make a new statement in Conservation Biology concerning the need for large and interconnected protected areas at least half their original size. >>Read the...

CPAWS Conservation Plan: 50% At Least

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, 2007 CPAWS Conservation plan calls for at least 50% of Canada’s public lands and waters to be protected. This number is based on the best available science about what is necessary to keep vibrant evolving ecosystems and all the species that inhabit them alive through time. It also represents the belief that our one species can share the earth with all the others. >>Read the entire Conservation...
Saving Nature’s Legacy: Protecting and Restoring

Saving Nature’s Legacy: Protecting and Restoring

Reed F. Noss and Allen Y. Cooperrider in Saving Nature’s Legacy: Protecting and Restoring Biodiversity (Island Press, Washington, D.C., 1994) Noss & Cooperrider reviewed many conservation planning initiatives and determined that between 25% and 75% protection was necessary to maintain ecological integrity. Written by two leading conservation biologists, Saving Nature’s Legacy is a thorough and readable introduction to issues of land management and conservation biology. It presents a broad, land-based approach to biodiversity conservation in the United States, with the authors succinctly translating principles, techniques, and findings of the ecological sciences into an accessible and practical plan for action. After laying the groundwork for biodiversity conservation – what biodiversity is, why it is important, its status in North America – Noss and Cooperrider consider the strengths and limitations of past and current approaches to land management. They then present the framework for a bold new strategy, with explicit guidelines on: Inventorying biodiversity Selecting areas for protection Designing regional and continental reserve networks Establishing monitoring programs Setting priorities for getting the job done Throughout the volume, the authors provide in-depth assessments of what must be done to protect and restore the full spectrum of native biodiversity to the North American continent. Buy this...

Half of B.C. must be protected as hedge against climate change

Half of B.C. must be protected as hedge against climate change, by Larry Pynn, Vancouver Sun January 27, 2010 The B.C. government is being asked to develop a joint strategy for nature conservation and climate change leading to biodiversity protection for half the province’s land base. A coalition of leading environmental groups says that existing parks and protected areas cover almost 15 per cent of the land base — not nearly enough to protect landscapes and wildlife against the ravages of climate change. The report, prepared by forest ecologist Jim Pojar, recommends that “at least an additional 35 per cent of the land base (be) managed for biodiversity and carbon,” a recognition that natural forests store carbon dioxide better than do industrial forests. New land designations and/or tenures will likely be required to guide management of the expanded conservation network outside of existing parks and protected areas, the report states. Only activities “compatible with the long-term objectives of biodiversity conservation and adaptation” should be allowed in these new areas, it said. Connectivity of landscapes will become increasingly important as B.C.’s climate continues to warm and species migrate to find new homes. >>Continue reading >>Read the new climate...
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